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18
Aug

FY17 Officer Selection Boards — UPDATES!!

FY17 Officer Selection Boards — UPDATES!!

THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED ON: 16 Aug2017, 1000 CST


17OT04 Civilian Applicant Officer Selection Board – DOES NOT APPLY TO ACTIVE DUTY APPLICANTS


 17OT05 Active Duty Applicant Officer Selection Board

– If selected Go to https://cs2.eis.af.mil/sites/11470/4%20%20Active%20Duty%20Selection%20Instructions/Forms/AllItems.aspx to get Manual Active Duty Selection Instructions and form to fill out. Email form to [removed].

– Anticipated to be released via PSDM 17-XX, NLT 15 September 2017.


17OT06 Civilian Applicant Officer Selection Board – DOES NOT APPLY TO ACTIVE DUTY APPLICANTS


NEW!! 17OT07 Active Duty Applicant Officer Selection Board – CANCELLED

– Due to the overwhelming number of highly qualified AD Applications, AFRS has reached our FY18 Accessions Requirements.

– Applications from 17OT03 and 17OT05 will NOT roll into FY18.  If you wish to apply for a commission, you MUST resubmit your Application Package during the application window, FY18 Board Schedule uploaded under Board Schedule and Application Cut-off Dates.


 

Officer Selection Boards are subject to be cancelled once our accessions targets are meet.

25
Jul

Aircraft Sizes

One of my followers created this.  Click Here to download the PDF version with links.

USAF Aircraft Sizes (with links)

25
Jul

18 Month Update

Busy, Busy, Busy

It has been 18 months since I commissioned, and it has been a wild ride.  I have been waiting for life to calm down and be “normal” again, but I am beginning to realize that being busy is the new normal.  I think this is the nature of the game.  I miss the comfort of enlisted life, but at the same time I know I am becoming a more seasoned leader and am being pushed past where my previous boundaries existed.  I believe the degree of success you achieve as an officer will be measured by how well you can conquer the chaos, and how well you inspire the people around you to more effectively accomplish the mission.  As of now I am still trying to conquer the chaos.

Over the past 18 months I have realized I am in a 24/7/365 battle of balance.  When I was in training the Air Force asked a lot from me; I had to maintain my relationships with my family while fulfilling and exceeding my responsibilities as an Airman.  My Airman responsibilities evolved from being a Cadet at OTS, to being a student in tech school, to becoming an expert in my space system (we call them weapon systems).  Once I mastered one duty position I was asked to master another one.  After I master the second one, I will be asked to master a third.

There is a “track” we are expected to follow and there is a constant pressure to be moving upward through this track.  There is more of an emphasis on my career and whether or not I am staying on track, and less of an emphasis on the mission.  I honestly think this is a fundamental flaw of the system.  The flaw is not the existence of the track, but the emphasis.  Instead of focusing on which officer is excelling most and who is ready for the next step, we should focus on which mission related positions needs to be filled and which officer would be the best fit.

“Leadership”

I was chatting with one of the Lieutenants in my squadron and he was asking for my advice about the track he was on.  There were rumors that he was being looked at to be promoted from the basic operator job to a more advanced/technical position.  In the space ops world we all start with some version of satellite operator, which is the basic level certification.  Some of us operate the bus of the satellite (the brain, power, and associated guts), and some of us work with a specific payload (component responsible for the mission).  For our first duty position, it is crucially important that we understand the technical aspects of our job.  As a brand new operator we aren’t expected to lead, we are expected to be “weapon system experts.”  Once we know how to operate our system nominally (space lingo for normally), we are expected to know how we can leverage our system to more effectively deliver combat effects downrange.  Later in our career we will transition to higher levels of leadership, but this is our ONE opportunity to have a technical-operator foundation.  I can’t say this enough, it is crucial for us to have this depth of technical-operator experience.  This experience will be our foundation as we advance to future leadership positions.  In my opinion, truly outstanding officers will be able to have a depth of technical experience in multiple systems.  Remind me and I will blog about the depth and breadth debate.

The fundamental flaw of many failed leaders in our Air Force is that they fake their way through the foundation phase of their career and fallback on the tag word of leadership.  I’m not saying leadership isn’t important, because it is crucial.  But in my opinion the core of a good leader in our Air Force is a person who can have a genuine connection with people.  This leader has to truly understand the challenges that we as Airmen face, and should have spent the years prior to being designated as “leader” figuring out how to deal with and eliminate those challenges.  The only way to do this as a 13S is to spend time on the system, i.e., “in the trenches,” dealing with the challenges of being a space operator.  If you as a space operator ever feel like you are a second class citizen, or everything you do isn’t important to the rest of your squadron, your leadership has forgotten where they came from or has likely never spent an extended amount of time in the trenches.  Don’t be this type of leader, and always remember that the squadron should be “ops focused.”

I attempted to explain this to the Lieutenant in my squadron and his response was, “Yeah but that is a more technical job, and isn’t really leadership based.”  He was missing the point, and this is something I want you guys to get.  He was succumbing to the upward pull of tag word “leadership.”  He was allowing the political pull to draw him away from his technical contribution to the mission.  In his defense, he was an academy grad and he had spent four years of his life living and breathing political Air Force leadership.

Commissioning Sources

The other thing that I have learned over the past 18 months is what I have coined “locked in experience.”  It has been difficult to find my place as an officer.  As a MSgt select my peers were seasoned NCOs or SNCOs.  Most had families but we had all been around a while.  We knew how the Air Force game worked and we had figured out how to play it well but still have a life outside of the Air Force.  Now, that peer group doesn’t look at me the same.  I am an officer, someone who crossed over to the dark side and there is a level of mistrust behind their eyes.  Some feel threatened by me or some just naturally put up a wall.  It is minute, but it is there.  I’m not saying it is everyone, but this is a subtle thing I have picked up by many.  Heck, maybe it is all in my head.  Even if it is in my head and it is a superficial barrier, doesn’t it still exist?  It is something to think about as you start your own journey.

If I can’t relate to who my peers were, maybe I can relate to who my peers are now.  There are three categories of officers; academy graduates, ROTC graduates, and those who commissioned through OTS.  95% of the officers I work with are academy or ROTC graduates, which means almost all of the Lieutenants are in their mid 20’s.  I am 30 so that alone creates a huge gap between us.  They are just figuring out how to live life outside of college, and I have been earning stripes and fighting the fight for 11 years.  They are dating or newly married, I have been married for a decade.  We are in completely different stages of life.

When I first commissioned and started spending time around the other Lieutenants, it was difficult because I looked at other Lieutenants like kids.  They acted similar to new A1Cs or Senior Airmen (from a NCO/SNCO perspective) but it threw me off because they were extremely intelligent and seemed better educated than I was.  That may sound terrible, but remember that I started in Security Forces where the enlistment requirements were different and education wasn’t actively pursued by all.  It took me a long time, probably almost 18 months, to learn that I indeed respected them.  Learning how I respected them was revolutionary to my perspective as an officer.  At first I thought I had to fit in with them, but over time I realized we are just on different paths.  My path involved 11 years of Air Force experience, and their path provided them with surface level Air Force experience concurrent with outstanding educations.  At the end of the day, we just bring different things to the table.

As we all began to traverse our paths through our new officer careers, I began to notice the very distinct differences between how we operated.  Academy grads have a tendency to take an indifferent approach to tackling challenges.  When faced with a task, their eyes glaze over and they try to find the easiest way to complete the task while still delivering most of what the boss is looking for.  ROTC grads attack the task eagerly, but they don’t have a lot of experience so they tend to take a hands-off approach and let the NCOs do their thing.  OTS grads are all over the place, it really depends on the person.  Understanding an OTS graduates’ methods often requires analysis at the next level; prior and non-prior enlisted experience.

Locked in Experience

At first it was easy for me to lump myself in the OTS prior-enlisted category, but the more I did, the more I realized I didn’t fit into that category either.  I am not just prior enlisted, I am a prior enlisted [essentially] SNCO.  I had spent 11 years developing into the SNCO the Air Force wanted me to be.  I know how to relate to Airmen “in the trenches,” I naturally try to mentor and mold young Lieutenants into outstanding future leaders, and I started playing the Air Force game while my peers were in high school (or earlier).  When I commissioned, this experience was “locked in” for me and I started a new path as an officer.  My experience didn’t go away, it shaped who I was when I started this officer journey.  It is evident because I still try to take care of the Airmen, and try to help my fellow Lieutenants figure out the Air Force game.

There are other prior enlisted officers who crossed over as Senior Airmen or Staff Sergeants.  They enjoy the Air Force life, and they have a more eager and optimistic view of the Air Force.  They are good at their job and think they can change the world.  When they crossed over, their SrA/SSgt experience was “locked in,” and they began their journey as officers.  Their experience didn’t go away, but it is evident in how they lead their people and perform ops on the floor.

This theory can also be seen from officers who re-trained from different career fields like Misileers or prior maintainers.  It also applies to ROTC and academy grads, except their “locked in” experience includes four years of Air Force academy BS or four years of civilian college with the Air Force sprinkled in.  I believe this is why ROTC graduates are better rounded leaders as they begin their officer careers, because they already had to juggle life outside of the Air Force while doing the Air Force thing.

The fascinating thing is that we will never develop past where we were before.  I will always be a SNCO at the heart.  Prior SrA/SSgt’s will always be prior SrA/SSgt’s, and fresh ROTC/Academy graduates will have a more academic perspective.  Regardless of where we started or what experience we had in the past, we all start our commissioned journey at the same time.  We all commissioned at the same time, will promote at the same time, and will compete for the same jobs.  As commissioned officers we will all develop together, and start being molded into the officers the Air Force wants us to be.

Tying it All Together

I bring this up in an attempt to illustrate the importance of experience.  There is nothing we can do about our life prior to commissioning, but as brand new Lieutenants this is our one chance to build experience going forward.  The officer track moves very quickly, probably 3-4 times faster than our enlisted counterparts.  We are expected to hit the ground running and accelerate through the many years of our career.  Due to the intensity of our tracks, it is crucial that we spend our time as operators developing into tactical, knowledgeable system experts.  If we don’t do it now, we will never have a chance to go back and do it over again.

19
Jul

TFOT Course Change Rumors

This may be old news by now, but a reader sent me this a few weeks ago.  He was a 17-05 graduate who wanted to share what he had heard regarding the TFOT course changes.
Class 17-07 and 17-08, I am eagerly awaiting to hear of any major changes!

  • No more TFIT – just the 8-week TFOT course.  The indoctrination phase will be shortened to only a couple days.  They will rely on the prior enlisted members to help the non-priors get up to speed.
  • There are now about 40 hours of CBTs to replace the courses that were removed from the syllabus.  Completing the CBTs is a prerequisite to attending TFOT.  The good news:  incoming cadets can test out of many of these CBTs.  This should save prior enlisted members a lot of time.  (Admin note:  I have heard the testing out tests are no joke, so take them seriously!  – airforceotsguy)
  • There will actually be two more classroom days.  I believe this will be achieved by moving things around in the schedule and by removing some of the non-classroom material.  For example, my class 17-05 had 5 days of Combatives, while class 17-06 had 3 days; I can’t verify this will be the case for all future classes, but my assumption is this will be the types of changes made.  Additionally, we had a lot of free time (OPS APT) at the end of our course.  I think some of those days could be restructured to provide more classroom time.  Again, this is speculation on my part.
  • There will be substantially more Graded Leadership Positions (GLPs).  We had 2 GLPs when I went through, but I’ve heard the new curriculum will call for somewhere around 4-6.  I’m not sure where all of them are coming from, but I believe some of the additional duties will become GLPs.  For example, there was discussion of the Academic Monitor becoming a GLP because they do a lot of work and that responsibility continues throughout the course.
19
Jul

OTS Total Force Officer Training Prerequisite Course

https://www.holmcenter.com/index.php?menu=tfot_intro

I didn’t have to take this course so I am shooting blind here.  Here is the link to the prerequisite course.  I try to keep all useful links under the “Reference” tab on my site.

13
Jul

TFOT Pre-Requisite Course – Wings

From the inbox:

Many people are having trouble updating their profile for the TFOT prerequisite site.  The home page has a broken link to verify personal information.  Here is a workaround:

20107881_10213471234838804_1860795554_o

28
Jun

FY2018 Line Officer Board Schedule

Disclaimer:  I do not have a need to stay up-to-date on the board schedule.  I will do my best to keep this updated for you all, but if you notice a discrepancy please post a comment to let me know.

The 2018 schedule was released!  Here are the dates:

Basically the first thing you should do is check the schedule to see when the next upcoming board is.  Check the SharePoint of AF Portal sites for the most up-to-date information because it changes often.

This is the schedule which applies to those who wish to apply for one of the OTS boards.

Board #
Application cut-off
Board Date
Estimated Release Date

 

17OTCAD

Rolling
Rolling
Rolling

18OT01 (Civilian)

15 Sep 17
20 Oct 17
17 Nov 17

18OT02 (Active Duty)

19 Jan 18
16 Feb 18
16 Mar 18

18OT03 (Civilian)

13 Apr 18
18 May 18
15 Jun 18

18OT04 (Active Duty)

13 Jul 18
17 Aug 18
14 Sep 18

Notes:
1.  (CAD) Critical Accessions Degree’s are listed in afrsi36-2001 Para 6.6.1. boards will be conducted on a rolling basis
2.  Apps Must be received NLT midnight on the app cutoff date at HQ AFRS
3.  “Active Duty” Boards are for current Enlisted REGAF applicants only

Effective:  27 June 2017


FY 18 LO Board Schedule

28
Jun

FY17 Officer Selection Boards — UPDATES!! (27 June 2017)

FY17 Officer Selection Boards — UPDATES!!

THIS PAGE WAS UPDATED ON: 27 June 2017, 1010 CDT

17OT01 Non-Rated Officer Selection Board

– Released via PSDM 17-30.
– If you are a Selectee, follow the instructions at the link “SELECTED FOR A COMMISSION – NEXT STEPS” in the Navigation Menu to the left. Follow the Instructions carefully.
– NEW!! – DUE TO A RECENT SHAREPOINT MERGER – UPLOADING YOUR DOCUMENTS IS NOT WORKING – WE ARE WORKING ON GETTING THIS FIXED ASAP. We were able to retrieve information already posted, we will contact selects if additional information is needed when assigning class dates.

– Go to https://cs2.eis.af.mil/sites/11470/4%20%20Active%20Duty%20Selection%20Instructions/Forms/AllItems.aspx to get Manual Active Duty Selection Instructions and form to fill out. Email form to AFRS.RSOCL.afrsadselect@us.af.mil .

PLEASE DO NOT CALL AFRS TO INQUIRE ABOUT ATTENDING TFOT – YOU WILL RECEIVE AN OFFICIAL LETTER FROM AFRS/RSOC APPROX. 90 DAYS BEFORE YOU NEED TO REPORT!!


 17OT02 Rated Officer Selection Board

– Released via PSDM 17-25.
– If you are a Selectee, follow the instructions at the link “SELECTED FOR A COMMISSION – NEXT STEPS” in the Navigation Menu to the left. Follow the Instructions carefully.
NEW!! – DUE TO A RECENT SHAREPOINT MERGER – UPLOADING YOUR DOCUMENTS IS NOT WORKING – WE ARE WORKING ON GETTING THIS FIXED ASAP. We were able to retreive information already posted, we will contact selects if additional information is needed when assigning class dates.

– Go to https://cs2.eis.af.mil/sites/11470/4%20%20Active%20Duty%20Selection%20Instructions/Forms/AllItems.aspx to get Manual Active Duty Selection Instructions and form to fill out. Email form to AFRS.RSOCL.afrsadselect@us.af.mil .

PLEASE DO NOT CALL AFRS TO INQUIRE ABOUT ATTENDING TFOT – YOU WILL RECEIVE AN OFFICIAL LETTER FROM AFRS/RSOC APPROX. 90 DAYS BEFORE YOU NEED TO REPORT!!


 17OT03 Active Duty Applicant Officer Selection Board

– Anticipated to be released to commanders for notification on 9 June 2017 via PSDM 17-43, prior to public release 16 June 2017, 0900L.

– Go to https://cs2.eis.af.mil/sites/11470/4%20%20Active%20Duty%20Selection%20Instructions/Forms/AllItems.aspx to get Manual Active Duty Selection Instructions and form to fill out. Email form to AFRS.RSOCL.afrsadselect@us.af.mil .

PLEASE DO NOT CALL AFRS TO INQUIRE ABOUT YOUR APPLICATION OR SELECTION RESULTS!!


 17OT04 Civilian Applicant Officer Selection Board – DOES NOT APPLY TO ACTIVE DUTY APPLICANTS


 17OT05 Active Duty Applicant Officer Selection Board

– NEW!  The Application deadline has been extended to COB 15 Jun 2017 to accomodate for site downtime. The site is up and running, however, only use the “SAVE FOR LATER” button. Do not click box to acivate submit button, it is not working. You will get an error if you do. After you hit the “Save for Later” button, if you can see your record we have it. We will communicate with you through sharepoint on your application status the during the week before the board start date.  CHECK THIS PAGE FREQUENTLY FOR UPDATES. 

– Late or incomplete applications will be rejected and will NOT meet this Board.

– 17OT03 non-selects will automatically rollover to this 17OT05 board if eligible, DO NOT resubmit new application.

– Go to https://cs2.eis.af.mil/sites/11470/4%20%20Active%20Duty%20Selection%20Instructions/Forms/AllItems.aspx to get Manual Active Duty Selection Instructions and form to fill out. Email form to AFRS.RSOCL.afrsadselect@us.af.mil .

– Anticipated to be released via PSDM 17-XX, NLT 1 September 2017.


17OT06 Civilian Applicant Officer Selection Board – DOES NOT APPLY TO ACTIVE DUTY APPLICANTS


NEW!! 17OT07 Active Duty Applicant Officer Selection Board – CANCELLED

– Due to the overwhelming number of highly qualified AD Applications, AFRS has reached our FY18 Accessions Requirements.

– Applications from 17OT03 and 17OT05 will NOT roll into FY18.  If you wish to apply for a commission, you MUST resubmit your Application Package during the application window.

– The FY18 LO Board Schedule will be uploaded shortly.


 

Officer Selection Boards are subject to be cancelled once our accessions targets are meet.

6
Jun

Military Pay

Everyone in the Air Force, and the DoD for that matter, is paid by the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS).  Once you join the Air Force someone will set you up with a “myPay” account page on the DFAS web site.  You can use myPay to manage almost anything finance related (e.g., download your W-2 tax forms, change how you claim on your W-4, set up allotments which are automatic transfers from your paycheck to separate bank accounts, or view your pay stubs.)

The first one you are likely concerned with is your military pay stub, which we call a Leave and Earnings Statement (LES.)  There are a lot of other sites out there which explain how to view your LES, so I am just going to focus on how you can use the internet to calculate your military pay once you commission.

The LES is divided into three main financial sections; Entitlements, Deductions, Allotments, and Summary.  Here is a breakdown of each:

Entitlements

Your entitlements are what the military owes or pays you.  There are two main types of entitlements, Base Pay and Allowances.  The main difference between the two is base pay is taxable, allowances are not.  This is a huge unseen benefit of being in the military.

My LES is composed of the following entitlements:

  • Base Pay
  • Basic Allowance for Subsistence (BAS)
  • Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH)

Base Pay

Base Pay is a publicly available number anyone can reference on the web.  Click Here for the link to the DFAS site which has all of the military pay tables from 1949 to the present.  To find your base pay, find your Time in Service (TIS) in Years at the top of the chart.  If you are a non-prior at OTS, I assume your TIS starts the day you begin OTS, so your TIS will be “2 or less.”  Next, find your pay grade and you will see your “Base Pay.”

The day you start OTS you will be a Staff Sergeant, which is pay grade E-5.  The day you commission you will be separated as a Staff Sergeant and commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, O-1.  Prior enlisted officers (over three or four years TIS, I can’t remember), can qualify for O-1E which is a slightly higher rate.

The 2017 base pay for an O-1, 2 or less TIS is:  $3,034.80 per month (taxable).

Pay Table

Basic Allowance for Subsistence (BAS)

The military pays us a standard rate per month for food.   The military doesn’t control how you spend this money, so you could technically spend $100 on rice and beans for the entire month and pocket the rest, but this is the allowance you are given.  Every time I search for an official site for this I always find a different site.  When I did the search today, the .gov site actually had the wrong number (it wasn’t updated since 2014).  Nonetheless, here is the site which matches what I get for BAS.

The BAS is the same rate for the entire year, one rate for officers and one rate for enlisted.  Here is the site:

https://www.federalpay.org/military/bah-bas

The 2017 BAS for officers is:  $253.63 per month (non-taxable).

I honestly can’t remember how this works while in OTS.  I think you get BAS but since you have the chow hall available for each meal you eat they deduct it from your pay in the form of “Meal Deductions” under the deductions category.

Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH)

The military also gives us an allowance for housing.  This rate is calculated by zip code, pay grade, and whether or not you have dependents.  In the Air Force if you are single, you have no dependents.  If you are married you have one dependent; you are the sponsor and your spouse is your dependent.  If you are married and have two kids you have three dependents; you are the sponsor, your wife and kids are the dependents.  The “with dependent” rate is the same regardless if you have one or seven dependents.

While in OTS as a non-prior you will not get BAH because you will be housed in the dorms.  After OTS, your BAH will kick in once you arrive at your first duty station.  For some, your first duty station is your first operational base, for others your first duty station is your tech school.  It depends on your tech school length.

Here is the link to my post about how to tell if your tech school is a PCS or TDY:

https://airforcejourney.com/2017/05/26/is-tech-school-a-pcs-or-tdy/

If you are a non-prior with dependents my understanding for how this works is unclear, so this is only an educated guess.  If you have dependents, your BAH may kick in for the zip code where your dependents are located once you start OTS.  If that is the case you will get that rate until you check in to your next base.  Ask the Facebook Forum for more details on this, the people there are “closer” to the issue and therefore more “in the know.”

Click Here for the official site for BAH.

The BAH for an O-1 at Tinker AFB, OK, without dependents is currently:  $1,140.00 per month (non-taxable).  I picked Tinker AFB because I think it is one of the lowest BAH rates.

Entitlements Summary

Here is the summary of what a O-1 entitlements as of June 2017.

  • Base Pay $3,034.80 per month
  • BAS $253.63 per month
  • BAH (Tinker AFB) $1,140.00 per month

Deductions

I don’t really know how the government knows what to take out for taxes (does anyone?)  I am just going to give you guys hard numbers and you can use them to make an educated guess for yourself.

  • Entitlements
    • BASE PAY:  $4,533.90
  • Deductions
    • FEDERAL TAXES:  $291.74
    • FICA-SOC SECURITY:  $281.10
    • FICA-MEDICARE:  $65.74
    • SGLI:  $29.00
    • SGLI FAM/SPOUSE:  $6.50
    • ROTH TSP:  XXXX
    • MID-MONTH-PAY:  XXXX

Here is what I know about these:

  • SGLI is life insurance.  I pay $29.00 per month for $400,000 of coverage.
  • SGLI Family/Spouse is life insurance for my family.  I think it is $100,000 for my wife and $10,000 for my kids, something like that.
  • Roth TSP:  Through myPay you can set up a portion of your base pay to go straight to your Thrift Savings Plan (TSP).  TSP is similar to a civilian 401K.
  • Mid Month Pay:  Given all of your entitlements, deductions, and allotments, the government calculates about half of this and pays you 1/2 on the 15th and 1/2 on the 1st.  The “mid month pay” is what they pay you on the 15th.

Allotments

Through myPay you can have some of your check go into one account and some of your money go into another account.  Your primary account is going to be the one for your primary pay, allotments are for wherever else you want your money.  I have my pay deposited in my checking account but I set up a $1,000 for a separate savings account.  The $1,000 will show up in this section as “DISCRETIONARY ALT.”

The only other thing on my Allotments category is TRICARE DENTAL which costs me $28.87.

Summary

If my base pay was $6,000 and I had $1,000 in deductions and allotments, the government would owe me $5,000 per month.  The military will divide this in two and pay me $2,500 on the 15th and $2,500 on the 1st.  The mid-month-pay in deductions is the former, the End of Month Pay is the latter.

After OTS you should be entitled to “Dislocation Allowance” or “Clothing Allowance”  (ask me if you have no idea what these are), and these will show up as an additional line in your “Entitlements.”  For that month you will get paid more so your mid-month-pay may or may not be the same.  A lot of times they won’t adjust your mid-month pay but they will “catch up” what they owe you at the end of the month.  Sometimes they will over-estimate your mid-month pay then correct it for the End of Month.  Sometimes, they will mess up your pay then add a $389.17 deduction to your next paycheck.  Bottom line, pay attention to make sure that what they are doing makes sense.  If it doesn’t, ASK FINANCE.  If you don’t, they will probably never know that something is wrong until 9 months later when they realize you were overpaid by $8,000.  If you don’t pay attention you won’t notice something is wrong until you don’t get paychecks for two months because they are re-couping the cost.  This sounds crazy, but this actually happens.

Additional Resources:

Here is a site I found which spells out how to read an actual military LES:

http://www.military.com/spouse/military-benefits/money-management/how-to-read-a-military-les-leave-and-earnings-statement.html

4
Jun

TFOT Class Videos

Prior to OTS I actually refused to watch a lot of videos because I was partially in denial that I had to go through this stressful, life-changing event.  After I completed the program, I realized how valuable the experience was and I cherish the memories and lessons I learned there.

Class videos are a great way to capture the experience, but it honestly means so much more to those in that class than outsiders looking in.  Regardless, it is our opportunity to share a piece of the experience with the graduates, so I encourage you to watch these videos.

I plan to work backwards and link as many videos as I can, but here is the most recent ones I found.


Class 17-05 (2 Jun 2017) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-y_jOT-ztA&feature=youtu.be

Class 17-04 (24 Mar 2017) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVmzVbo8s-0

Class 17-02 (18 Nov 2016) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbGzNDlsRuw

Class 16-08 (9 Sep 2016) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdJHfBBJfBE

Class 16-07 (17 Jun 2016) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJegtu9FC4g

Class 16-05 (8 Mar 2016) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4RjkQq0lcw

Class 16-03 (18 Dec 2015) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWvKeAn_bb8

Class 16-02 (11 Dec 2015) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K6F3tEXXYk